Tag Archives: art

Ridgefield and NYC

Over the weekend I have not had a moment to offer an update. I have been out and about in Connecticut and New York City packing my days with activities. Now I’m in Bermuda and things have slowed down to the point that I can take a little time to report. I have marked statements not meant to be taken as literal fact with “*”.

Ridgefield

A visit to NYC is not complete without a stop in Ridgefield Connecticut to visit my old college roommate, Greg. COVER ART: A somewhat menacing woven tapestry of swans in the Aldrige Museum of Modern Art in Ridgefield.

img_20181117_100832712
Start the day with pancake tacos.
img_20181117_130224740
A lovely little Native American zombie girl* adorns the wall in the Ridgefield magic shop, where Nydia picked up some trinkets to share with her friends at home.
img_20181117_124534936
In the Ridgefield bookstore we learn that Dr. Seuss wrote at least one book for people in their second childhoods as well as his better known books aimed at the first.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Carl Jung’s “The Red Book” gives readers a friendly introduction to the realms of madness of which men do not speak*.

img_20181118_163225072_burst001
A tour of Greg’s apartment complex. This is a gym.
img_20181118_145913368
A sweet potato veggie burger wrapped in collard greens at Bare Burger
img_20181117_212247633
A server at Galo moves pasta to a plate from a partly hollowed out Parmigiano Reggiano wheel.

New York City

In NYC we visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

img_20181119_162719104
Quite a few of the art installments in the East Asia section were just weird rocks
img_20181119_162323010
“What if dew were really big?” (2007)*
img_20181119_162021564
Nazi vase. Just kidding. This is a vase from before 1940.
img_20181119_161353857
Ancient instruments. Proof that music has been going downhill since 2000 BC.*
img_20181119_153756673
The pharaoh nobody likes to talk about*
img_20181119_153618101
“Enormous bird and unlucky human” (c. 1897 BC)*
img_20181119_151623847
Finger and toe caps found in a sarcophagus

Next week: Bermuda!

Advertisements

The Penniless Researcher

An old creative writing teacher of mine recently posted on Facebook that Iggy Pop, a famous musician, could no longer support himself on his work. He blamed this on consumers, referring to a “give-me-stuff-but-I-won’t-pay-for-it culture.” This struck me as an unfair analysis, so, along with some other readers of this fellow’s Facebook posts, I looked more deeply into the issue.

The first thing that we found was that Iggy Pop has a net worth of $12 million. The issue here might be more along the lines of managing one’s money rather than not actually having enough money. The general point remained, though. Even if Iggy Pop is not actually as poor as he makes himself out to be, many artists are. Next, I tried to think of a solution that would offer artists a living wage while not taking art away from those who could not afford the prices it used to fetch before digital distribution.

The first answer was obvious: the radical divide between the rich and the poor is to blame. The middle class is the greatest consumer of affordably-priced art. If each member of the six billionaire Waltons – heirs to the Wal-Mart empire, buys a book, that’s six books sold for the price of a book. If the Waltons’ wealth-equivalent of middle class people each buy a book, the exercise is left to the reader, save to say that that’s a lot more books sold.

On another thought path, what if we could encourage art by subsidizing it? It turns out we do with the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA), but it gets so little funding ordinary folks like me don’t even know it exists.  This led me to think: what would science be if the National Science Foundation (NSF) were gutted like the NEA?

There would still be lucrative industry jobs, just like artists can get good careers as commercial artists, and there would be a few scientists who manage to develop something amazing, patent it, and become vastly wealthy, just like Iggy Pop, but then there would be the rest of the scientists, studying things with no direct benefit to any corporation. These scientists would likely be much like the struggling artists of today, barely making ends meet, telling themselves again and again that it’s all about “loving your work” while the roof of their cardboard box house/personal lab caves in on them from the rain. Then the public would benefit from their work. Maybe they’d get a private donation or two – enough that they could afford a new box. A big refrigerator box where they can lay down at night, and some plastic wrap to keep it from getting soggy and falling apart. Newly dry, and safe inside strong, reinforced cardboard, they think what a gift it is to be spending every day doing what they love.

But I digress. My old creative writing teacher and I agreed that more money to the NEA could help get new artists off the ground and encourage our nation’s creativity without shutting out the less wealthy consumers. I suggested that he write a letter to his representative to make this happen, and he said that although he lived in DC and didn’t have a national representative, he had already written several to various local representatives, crediting his letters and those of others with keeping the arts program open at one of his local schools. “Oh,” I said with a start, “you’re way ahead of me.”